Friday, April 6, 2018

Poetry Friday, #6 - Free Verse, Giveaway!

Happy First Friday of National Poetry Month!
Poetry Friday is Here Today!
Please scroll to the bottom to leave your link.




Welcome to my 2018 National Poetry Month Project! I love projects!
It is wonderful to find so many folks are joining in at blogs and elsewhere. 
All are welcome!

This year at The Poem Farm, I will be writing a new poem every day about the constellation Orion.  Every day I will highlight a new poetic technique, a technique used by poets and by writers of other genres as well. After all, the techniques of poets are the techniques of all writers. I will be using my Fall 2017 Heinemann book, POEMS ARE TEACHERS, to lead me as I write all April long.

My hope is that some readers might also choose to dive deeply into writing about 1 Subject 30 Ways, to stick with one subject for a few days or for a whole month, approaching it from a variety of perspectives, in a multitude of structures, and with many playful word explorations.

Here is a list of this month's poems so far:


And now...today's technique.

Free Verse Poem Drafting
Photo by Amy LV




Students - First, for the record, let me tell you that the part about Orion placing a bird back in his nest - I made that part up.  After all, all of the constellations' stories are fictions....I thought I would add a wee tale of my own.  I like imagining this moment for Orion.

Today's poem is written in free verse.  It does not rhyme or have a consistent meter.  I always strive to become a stronger writer of free verse, and there have been weeks here at The Poem Farm where I have taken on a Free Verse Week.  I do tend to lean toward meter, so working without the structure of sound and clear rhythm is a challenge for me.  Yet free verse has its own sound, and the more I read it, the more I understand it.  Reading out loud helps. 

I enjoyed thinking about Orion being a helper up in the sky, a mentor to so many of us, and as with most poems, there is usually more than one poetic technique to talk about.  This poem is in a list form, yes.  And it is also a little bit surprising at the end.  At least I hope it is.

Many of the mentor poems in POEMS ARE TEACHERS are written in free verse, and each of the free verse poems highlighted features other poetic techniques too. Sara Holbrook's poem "Brave" (page 194) ends with a surprise, and ending with a surprise is something that many writers of different genres do..  The two surprise ending student poet mentors (page 196) are Clare B. with "Smiling" and George M. with "A Bacteria Tragedy."  Thank you to these poets, and thank you to the teachers of all of the student poets featured in POEMS ARE TEACHERS.

Remember, you can connect with all kinds of poetry goodness happening throughout April 2018 at my introductory National Poetry Month post HERE.

I am hosting Poetry Friday today, a roundup of many poetry goodnesses throughout the Kidlitosphere.  Please visit these blogs of poetry lovers and know that you are welcome to join us any Poetry Friday throughout the year.

On Sunday, April 8 at 11:59pm, I will draw a winning name of a commenter on this post. This person will win a copy of POEMS ARE TEACHERS, compliments of Heinemann!  I will announce the winner on Monday.

If you would like to leave a link for this week, please click the blue box below.  And if you would like to see the links...here you go!



Please remember, you can find even more poetry fun at the 2018  National Poetry Month Kidlitosphere Events Roundup at Jama's Alphabet Soup.

See you tomorrow...with a how-to structure!

xo,
Amy

ps - Here is a close up of the photo you see above!

Zoom Out of the Above Photograph
Photo by Amy LV

Please share a comment below if you wish.

53 comments:

  1. Killer last line. What a terrific, deep project you've conjured up! Thanks, Amy!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hmm, a surprise, a creation? You have begun to change his story. I like the straightforward voice, a pleasant tale of someone we do know is "reliable". I like that 'stone still', Amy, a sky statue!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I like the last few lines and, "to place a bird back in it's nest," a tender telling moment–And your surprise at the end. I didn't know this about Orion, thank!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Amy. I love your project this April - such a rich resource, your website.
    In the event that you are hosting Poetry Friday this week, here is my contribution:
    https://gatheringbooks.org/2018/04/06/poetry-friday-22/

    ReplyDelete
  5. The voice is so full of authority, so knowledgeable. Then the last line delivers a punch when the source of the knowledge, the sage, is revealed.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Boy, what "everybody knows" is often not the full picture. Beautiful poem! PS Are you hosting the roundup, Amy?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Amy, I like the way you crafted your free verse poem starting with the title right down to the surprise ending. He stands stone still is a wonderful line to compare with the gentle movement at the end. Free verse is what I am comfortable with so I look forward to see what your padlet offers in the way of children's poems.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I've been enjoying your poetic challenge to yourself, Amy, been though I haven't been able to comment each day...it's a great idea! And yes, Orion was not the nicest guy - although with so many stories told about his legend, he was definitely a complicated "hero" - at least in the classic Greek sense of the word. Thanks for hosting, and congrats on all your book successes!

    ReplyDelete
  9. I've been enjoying following along with your Orion poetry month project. Thank you for sharing a great idea and for hosting this week.

    ReplyDelete
  10. :-) Oh, how I love the speaker's grandfather!

    ReplyDelete
  11. This is such an awesome, interesting challenge. Love the Orion surprise at the end with the bird's nest! Thanks so much for hosting this week, Amy!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I love your challenge this year. I've tried a few poems on a single topic, but never 30. Can't wait to see what you come up with.

    Thanks so much for hosting!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Poems truly are teachers, Amy, and especially yours. I am loving learning about Orion along with you. And I agree with others that the last line is beautiful. A loving shared moment with grandpa.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I am learning so much about poetry from tagging along as you write a new poem each day on this theme. I like how the final line here connects Orion with the lives and stories told by people.

    ReplyDelete
  15. My daughter and I attended the webinar you held last night for the Brave Writer Homeschool Alliance. I wanted to say a huge thank you!! You inspired both of us to have fun with words and poetry. My daughter loves all things space, so after you finished last night we went through and read all your Orion poems from the month. She loves them! Thank you for all the inspiration!

    ReplyDelete
  16. I love, love, love your Poetry Month idea, Amy. I just went back to read all of them; you continually amaze me. So many different perspectives, so much possibility. You inspire! <3

    ReplyDelete
  17. Thank you for hosting and for leading the way of exploring one subject in many different ways with different approaches and techniques. I'm following along with you exploring the story of Little Red Riding Hood. I can definitely relate to this Orion better than the brute one. It's one (maybe the only) constellation I can pick out of the sky consistently, and I always look for him as a friendly guide looking over him. I love your addition to his story!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Amy, as always, I'm loving your posts this month, and share your (and Mary Lee's) feelings about Orion! :) I love the surprise ending of today's poem. So lovely!

    I wasn't able to participate in your Brave Writer webinar last night, but I was delighted to see you there. I work for Brave Writer now as a writing coach. It's such a great fit (as Julie's homeschooling philosophies are so closely aligned to mine.) Love it!

    Thanks for hosting today amidst all your other Poetry Month Busy-ness! :)

    ReplyDelete
  19. You have a super "background" for your photos, Amy! What a good doggo. I'm impressed by your bravery and skill, doing 1 subject for 30 days! (It seems like it would be tempting to make your one subject "love" or "food." You definitely didn't take the easy way out!) Thanks for hosting!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Love what you're doing with your NPM challenge this year, Amy. Love the versatility! I also love that you've taken it upon yourself to soften his hunter persona. You're a bit like Orion, yourself, you know (the constellation, not the myth!) — constant, bright, guiding. xo

    ReplyDelete
  21. I love the gentle story you made up for tough Orion! I'm really enjoying following along with your efforts this month! Thanks for hosting today!

    ReplyDelete
  22. "To place a bird back in its nest...."
    That's what poems do, for all of us.
    This is gorgeous, Amy... xoxo

    ReplyDelete
  23. Putting a bird back in its nest is such a contrast to Orion the brute. The constancy of Orion in the first few lines is comforting.

    BTW, I filled out the link form for my poem from yesterday. It’s to students, and I don’t know what poem will greet me today.

    ReplyDelete
  24. This is a fabulous challenge! I love that you are pushing yourself to write a poem everyday! Thank you for challenging us and setting the example! :) Hope to get my hands on your book soon!

    ReplyDelete
  25. I'm so enjoying learning more about poetry as I tag along during your challenge. I love the idea of a different form each day. Brilliant! Thanks for hosting and for your generous sharing of all things poetic.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Thanks for hosting! Happy Friday!

    ReplyDelete
  27. Orion - one of my favorites and I always know where I am based on where he is. He keeps me connected to far-flung family. Thanks for the poem and hosting the day!

    ReplyDelete
  28. Thanks for hosting. My link will not post no matter what I have tried. I have never had a problem with this format before. https://books4learning.blogspot.com/2018/04/cricket-in-thicket-poems-about-bugs.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I kept trying and trying. I just closed everything out. I was going to try again. Then, I saw you did it for me. I appreciate it. I was so frustrated! Have a fantastic day!

      Delete
  29. Great project! Love your new book WITH MY HANDS! Wish I could give myself a writing challenge--but it's hard to write poetry when I'm caring for my three-year-old granddaughter. That's okay, though, because she keeps us laughing.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Thanks for hosting, Amy--I'm very impressed with your free verse challenge to yourself, and for admitting that it's a challenge for you. I think we assume that free verse is "easier" than formal poetry, but for some of us the parameters do some of the heavy lifting. And I'm still goggling over your choice of topic on which to spend 30 days of writing!

    ReplyDelete
  31. Hello!! What an outstanding amount of resources available! Thank you! I love the idea of 1 Subject 30 Ways because it shows students that poetry is for everyone and everything. We have been on spring break this week, but when we return on Monday, I cannot wait to kick-off National Poetry Month with my students! I've dedicated quite a bit of time to gathering books, collecting mentor poems, and writing lessons that I feel will work well with my students age, background, and interests. I think your book alone would have saved me so much time and energy! Either way, I've learned quite a bit about the power of poetry, and that is what is most important. :-) Exposing kids to poetry not only helps them think critically, but it also unleashes their creative side! It engages them in learning about language in ways that only poetry can! Your site is amazing, and your book POEMS ARE TEACHERS is everything a teacher could ask for! I downloaded the sample on Heinemann, and I love that there are 3 poems to use as mentor texts in the classroom for that particular exploration (I love that you refer to each technique as an exploration!). Right now, I'm listening to the podcast on Heinemann of you talking about your book, and I love it!! There are so many opportunities, for both teachers and students, to learn and grow when using poetry in the classroom. It is something teachers should practice all year round, rather than just April, but at least many use April as a starting point. Your book sounds like the perfect tool to not only expose my students to poetry year round, but to also focus on specific aspects of it to improve their skills as writers. Thank you so much for hosting this challenge. I'm looking forward to learning even more in the coming weeks! :-)

    As for my contribution, I do not keep a blog where I post poetry of my own, but I do have recommendations for those who teach kids in the older grades. My students first fell in love the work of Kwame Alexander and Jason Reynolds when they realized the characters in their books mirrored their own lives. They were able to relate to them on a personal level, which sparked some amazing discussions and opportunities for growth. While it's important to me to introduce kids to poetry of all types, from all walks of life and age groups, it is equally important to me for them to have continuous exposure to the work of their favorite authors and poets to keep them motivated and excited about how people use language. If you are interested, some of the poems I use come from the blog of Jason Reynolds (iamjasonreynolds.com) and some come from books written by Kwame Alexander, which you can find on his website (kwamealexander.com). *As always, you will first want to review the content to see if it is appropriate for your students and their age group, etc.**

    Thank you so much for all your help, support, and hard work! You are appreciated! :-)

    ReplyDelete
  32. I love, love love, this challenge! It would be a great student project for next April to try out and use your poems as a mentor project. Free verse poems are my favorite to write and to read, particularly those in poetic narratives like "Locomotion" by Jacqueline Woodson.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Dear Amy,

    I am an avid star-gazer, so I love that you have chosen Orion to look up to for writing inspiration throughout the month. Thank you for hosting today and for sharing your free verse with us!
    hugs,
    Kiesha

    ReplyDelete
  34. I love your project, Amy! Often I find myself circling back to the same subjects when I write, but never with the intention of exploring different forms and techniques. I am inspired to try this now--thank you for the inspiration, and being the hostess with the mostest.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Thank you for hosting! I love seeing all the STEPS of a poem coming together - I love Orion especially.

    ReplyDelete
  36. What a beautiful blend of hosting with a new poem as well as your project. I've enjoyed each day and have squeezed some really good writing out of it, myself. Thank you! Today, I find myself a little bit overwhelmed and dazzled by the big candy store Poetry Month is. I keep things simple at A Word Edgewise this week with a found poem from Time Magazine's 9 Questions with Tracy K. Smith. She's a poet with spunk.

    ReplyDelete
  37. This month of poetry is off to a great start! I love the idea of picking one subject and writing lots of different poems around it. It really is making me dig deep to express myself in lots of unique and creative ways. Thanks for the inspiration and the guidance you are offering. Also...the resources you have included are fantastic! Looking forward to continuing this journey with you!

    ReplyDelete
  38. The same subject for 30 days sounds daunting to me! I am excited to see how this unfolds.

    ReplyDelete
  39. You are such an inspiration and a motivator! I have really enjoyed reading your poems and have tried to keep up with a poem a day. I am a few days behind, but will definitely be catching up this weekend! My students are also jumping in and I will be posting some of their poems on your Padlet. Thanks for all you do and your willingness to share!

    ReplyDelete
  40. Just found your project—it's so cool! I will enjoy following Orion (and the many forms) for the rest of the month. I especially love those last four lines. You're a virtuoso!

    ReplyDelete
  41. You are rocking this challenge, Amy. I love stopping by each day to see what surprise awaits. I had to laugh when I saw today's selection: Free Verse. That is exactly what I wrote. Serendipity.

    ReplyDelete
  42. You are my poetry muse, Amy! Thank you for the inspiration and the beautiful poetry!

    ReplyDelete
  43. I love the last line - "My grandpa told me this." Not only is it a powerful last line that leaves no room for argument, it also sounds like music. I wonder what kinds of poems my students would write if they were challenged to insert a similar line to a poem of their own. I might just try it! Thanks for the inspiration

    ReplyDelete
  44. That last line...that did it for me, Amy. Thank you for all that you continuously teach us and give to our community!

    TeachingAuthors is in with six photos of poets from #TLA18 and a poem I wrote in 2013 called Poetry Sticks to Your Clothes!

    xox

    ReplyDelete
  45. Thank you for everything you are posting here. I've been reading every day (directed this way by Elisabeth Ellington, Carol Varsalona & others), and I've already used some of your prompts. My students especially enjoy seeing how you draft your poetry. I personally like the dog-as-book-holder. And I love the last line of today's poem; it changes the tone, somehow - makes me re-think what I've just read.

    ReplyDelete
  46. I have a friend who highly recommends your book and I can't wait to read it!

    ReplyDelete
  47. Thank you for hosting this week, Amy! I love this project and am in awe of the variety of content in all these poems so far. You are an inspiration!

    ReplyDelete
  48. Amy, I just read this post again (something I don't usually do) and had to comment again (something else I don't usually do) for two reasons. First, I want to say thank you for hosting #PoetryFriday this week. But most of all, I want to say THANK YOU for the daily posts you are offering this month with so much richness for poets and for teachers.

    ReplyDelete
  49. You are such a master at the rhyme and rhythm, the sounds and feel, the meaning and the heart. But you always nail your poems even when you stretch. Listening to your voice, your pace, where the word has a different tone brings this one alive and says, this is an Amy LV poem to me. The ending....mmmmwah! ( That's supposed to be a kiss.) I love it. You are a masterful teacher and poet, with a gleam in your eye and pen. Your book is a treasure. Should I be the lucky winner I know where it will go.
    Janet F.

    ReplyDelete
  50. Amazing collection of poetry resources! I'm using "Walking to the Barn" tomorrow. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  51. Dear Mrs. VanDerwater,
    We loved the new poem today and how it felt like we were going back in time!
    Love,
    Ms. Luft's and Mrs. Casler's and Mr. Szulgit's classes

    ReplyDelete