Thursday, April 26, 2018

Poem #26 - Ask WHAT IF?


Welcome to my 2018 National Poetry Month Project! I love projects!
It is wonderful to find so many folks are joining in at blogs and elsewhere. 
All are welcome!

This year at The Poem Farm, I will be writing a new poem every day about the constellation Orion.  Every day I will highlight a new poetic technique, a technique used by poets and by writers of other genres as well. After all, the techniques of poets are the techniques of all writers. I will be using my Fall 2017 Heinemann book, POEMS ARE TEACHERS, to lead me as I write all April long.

My hope is that some readers might also choose to dive deeply into writing about 1 Subject 30 Ways, to stick with one subject for a few days or for a whole month, approaching it from a variety of perspectives, in a multitude of structures, and with many playful word explorations.

Here is a list of this month's poems so far:


And now...today's technique.

Ask WHAT IF? Drafting
Photo by Amy LV




Students - If you have been following along this month, one thing you will have noticed is that most all of these poems could have fit into more than one poetic technique category.  I am thinking of another poem which fits the WHAT IF? category right now.  Do you know which one it is?  (Hint: It's on the list above, between April 9 and April 11.)

Last evening, when I began my draft, I did something that I often do.  I listed.  I listed possible WHAT IFs.  Doing this is a way to free up my brain, to consider many possible ideas - some workable, some less so.  Coming up with several possibilities lets me off the hook of feeling that my FIRST idea must be my BEST idea as this is seldom if ever true.

So go ahead!  Before you write your poem - or your anydraft - go ahead and diddle around in your mind and in your notebook awhile.  Come up with many possibilities before selecting one to draft.  Free your brain! 

Has Orion ever spoken to you?  No? Listen harder.

In my book POEMS ARE TEACHERS, I highlight finding ideas by asking WHAT IF?, with a poem by Kenn Nesbitt. The title of her poem (page 25) is "A Rumble in My Bedroom."  The two student poet mentors (page 27) are Lilia L. with "Snow Day at the Beach" and Jenelle with "Math on Mars."  Thank you to these poets, and thank you to the teachers of the student poets in this book!

Remember, you can connect with all kinds of poetry goodness happening throughout April 2018 at my introductory National Poetry Month post HERE.

See you tomorrow...with starting with a startle!

xo,
Amy

Please share a comment below if you wish.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Poem #25 - Address a Subject Directly


Welcome to my 2018 National Poetry Month Project! I love projects!
It is wonderful to find so many folks are joining in at blogs and elsewhere. 
All are welcome!

This year at The Poem Farm, I will be writing a new poem every day about the constellation Orion.  Every day I will highlight a new poetic technique, a technique used by poets and by writers of other genres as well. After all, the techniques of poets are the techniques of all writers. I will be using my Fall 2017 Heinemann book, POEMS ARE TEACHERS, to lead me as I write all April long.

My hope is that some readers might also choose to dive deeply into writing about 1 Subject 30 Ways, to stick with one subject for a few days or for a whole month, approaching it from a variety of perspectives, in a multitude of structures, and with many playful word explorations.

Here is a list of this month's poems so far:


And now...today's technique.

Poem of Address Drafting
Photo by Amy LV




Students - I knew that today's poem would be a poem of address.  I knew that it would be addressed to Orion.  But what would I say?  Well, this idea of supergiant stars turning to supernovas has intrigued me all month, and so this felt like the perfect time to warn Orion of this likelihood.  The truth is the truth, and today is the day.

When you write, always consider your audience.  Choose your audience.  Will you address your audience of human readers, or will you address your dog?  Will you address someone from history? A shift in audience creates a shift in style and tone and message.

This was a neat poem to write as it felt different than many of the other poems this month.  After 25 days, it felt good to talk with Orion, person to starperson.

In my book POEMS ARE TEACHERS, I highlight writing poems of address, or addressing a subject directly, with a poem by Doraine Bennett. The title of her poem (page 79) is "Great Blue."  The two student poet mentors (page 82) are Leo B. with "Alarm Clock" and Laura S. with "Guitar."  Thank you to these poets, and thank you to the teachers of the student poets in this book!

Remember, you can connect with all kinds of poetry goodness happening throughout April 2018 at my introductory National Poetry Month post HERE.

See you tomorrow...with finding ideas by asking What if...?

xo,
Amy

Please share a comment below if you wish.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Poem #24 - Inspired by a Memory


Welcome to my 2018 National Poetry Month Project! I love projects!
It is wonderful to find so many folks are joining in at blogs and elsewhere. 
All are welcome!

This year at The Poem Farm, I will be writing a new poem every day about the constellation Orion.  Every day I will highlight a new poetic technique, a technique used by poets and by writers of other genres as well. After all, the techniques of poets are the techniques of all writers. I will be using my Fall 2017 Heinemann book, POEMS ARE TEACHERS, to lead me as I write all April long.

My hope is that some readers might also choose to dive deeply into writing about 1 Subject 30 Ways, to stick with one subject for a few days or for a whole month, approaching it from a variety of perspectives, in a multitude of structures, and with many playful word explorations.

Here is a list of this month's poems so far:


And now...today's technique.

Inspired by a Memory Drafting
Photo by Amy LV

(Click to Enlarge)



Students - I was not sure how to begin today's poem, so I started with the words, "I remember."  I once learned that one way to generate many writing ideas is to simply repeat that phrase over and over and to keep writing.  So this was my plan.  But then, I just started writing this memory.  

The strange thing is that this is not an actual memory from my past.  Perhaps it is a memory I wish to have had or perhaps it is a bit of a memory from the first time someone (I know not who) pointed Orion out to me or perhaps it is a writing-memory related to Poem #17 in this series, "In a Small Backyard."  I don't know.

No matter how it came about, once I had those first couple of lines -

It was winter.
I remember.

I knew that I wanted the poem to be almost spare, just strong and simple nouns and verbs.  And there it is.  As I wrote, I imagined I was there. And I thought about how seeing or smelling or hearing a certain something can bring back a flood of memories.  Life is like that.

If you're not sure what to write about one day, consider trying this strategy.  Just repeat, "I remember..." and see what you get. Maybe real memories, maybe interesting imaginary memories.  The brain is an unique place of creation!

In my book POEMS ARE TEACHERS, I highlight writing from a memory with a poem by David L. Harrison. The title of his poem (page 36) is "Things We Prize."  The two student poet mentors (page 39) are Natalie F. with "Wesley" and Walter Z. with "Turtles."  Thank you to these poets, and thank you to the teachers of the student poets in this book!

Remember, you can connect with all kinds of poetry goodness happening throughout April 2018 at my introductory National Poetry Month post HERE.

See you tomorrow...with a poem of address!
xo,
Amy

Please share a comment below if you wish.

Monday, April 23, 2018

Kidlitosphere Progressive Poem!

If you are looking for Poem #23 
of One Subject 30 Ways,
visit HERE.


Welcome, friends, to the 7th annual Kidlitosphere Progressive Poem. Each year our poetfriend Irene Latham (do not miss her April Poetry Project) brings folks together for a potluck poem where in time, everyone who wishes brings a line to share.

When I read Liz Steinglass's opening line this year, I was ready to follow the adventure.  I love seeds and nestled things and the word cozy. And since I live near Buffalo, NY, where our last bits of snow melted just today, I am excited for green and growing.  

Reading Tabatha's line yesterday, thinking about how Jas is now writing a poem, and we're on our way to a party for Lee, I wanted to bring Lee back into the poem....and what better thing than to bring wordgifts to someone we love?

Enjoy!


Nestled in her cozy bed, a seed stretched. 

Oh, what wonderful dreams she had! 

Blooming in midnight moonlight, dancing with 

the pulse of a thousand stars, sweet Jasmine 

invented a game. 

"Moon?" she called across warm honeyed air. 

"I'm sad you're alone; come join Owl and me. 

We're feasting on stardrops, we'll share them with you." 

"Come find me," Moon called, hiding behind a cloud. 

Secure in gentle talons' embrace, Jasmine rose 

and set. She split, twining up Owl's toes, pale 

moonbeams sliding in between, Whoosh, Jasmine goes. 

Owl flew Jasmine between clouds and moon to Lee's party! 

Moon, that wily bright balloon, was NOT alone. 

                                                       Jas grinned,
                                                                
                                                               stretched,
                                                                          
                                                                     reached, 
                                                                             
                                                                           wrapped 
                                                                               
                                                                          a new, 
                                                      
                                                   around          tender
                                                              rootlet 

a trellis Sky held out to her, made of braided wind and song. 

Her green melody line twisted and clung. 

Because she was twining poet's jasmine, she 

wiggled a wink back at Moon, and began her poem. 

Her whispered words floated on a puff of wind, 

filled with light and starsong. "Revelers, lean in – 

let's add to this merriment a game that grows 

wordgifts for Lee. He's a man who knows


And now, I leave Jas's poem in the hands of the capable Mary Lee Hahn (do not miss her April poetry project), a gift of a teacher who also knows tons about words and gifting them to others.

******

To follow the poem day-by-day, please see below!

April




4 Michelle at Today's Little Ditty

5 Jan at bookseedstudio

6 Irene at Live Your Poem

7 Linda at TeacherDance

8 Janet F. at Live Your Poem



11 Brenda at Friendly Fairy Tales

12 Carol at Beyond LiteracyLink

13 Linda at A Word Edgewise


15 Donna at Mainely Write

16 Sarah at Sarah Grace Tuttle


18 Christie at Wondering and Wandering

19 Michelle at Michelle Kogan

20 Linda at Write Time



23 Amy at The Poem Farm

24 Mary Lee at A Year of Reading


26 Renee at No Water River

27 Buffy at Buffy's Blog

28 Kat at Kat's Whiskers

29 April at Teaching Authors

30 Doraine at Dori Reads

If you are looking for Poem #23 of One Subject 30 Ways, you will find it HERE.

Please share a comment below if you wish.

Poem #23 - Striking Words

If you are looking for the
2018 Kidlitosphere Progressive Poem,
visit HERE.

Congratulations to Linda Mitchell!
You have won a copy of POEMS ARE TEACHERS!
Please e-mail your address to amy@amylv.com
and Heinemann will mail your book.


Welcome to my 2018 National Poetry Month Project! I love projects!
It is wonderful to find so many folks are joining in at blogs and elsewhere. 
All are welcome!

This year at The Poem Farm, I will be writing a new poem every day about the constellation Orion.  Every day I will highlight a new poetic technique, a technique used by poets and by writers of other genres as well. After all, the techniques of poets are the techniques of all writers. I will be using my Fall 2017 Heinemann book, POEMS ARE TEACHERS, to lead me as I write all April long.

My hope is that some readers might also choose to dive deeply into writing about 1 Subject 30 Ways, to stick with one subject for a few days or for a whole month, approaching it from a variety of perspectives, in a multitude of structures, and with many playful word explorations.

Here is a list of this month's poems so far:


And now...today's technique.

Striking Words Drafting
Photo by Amy LV




Students - It is a little bit strange to write a poem thinking "I must write striking words" because of course I always want to write striking words.  But it was an interesting exercise to begin by writing a list of words I find striking, words including: embroider, exquisite, breathtaking, endless...  These words led me in to this poem, and now, when this project is over, I am actually going to learn to embroider the constellation Orion.  But that is another story.

I often write about collecting words, and today, doing so helped me find a poem.  It also helped me revise.  You should know that the last few lines of the poem originally read:

I sew
this magnificent
starguy creation
because
head-to-toe
I feel
deep admiration.

Why the revision?  Welllll....."head-to-toe" is not so striking, and neither is "deep admiration."  Both of these phrases are common phrases, so I revised them away.  I often revise to lose phrases that seem too everyday. You might try this too.  Try many many words!

In my book POEMS ARE TEACHERS, I highlight striking words with a poem by Jane Yolen. The title of her poem (page 128) is "Nest."  The two student poet mentors (page 131) are Nora P. with "The Moon is Me" and Jessica W. with "Summer on Lillis Road."  Thank you to these poets, and thank you to the teachers of the student poets in this book!

Remember, you can connect with all kinds of poetry goodness happening throughout April 2018 at my introductory National Poetry Month post HERE.

See you tomorrow...with a poem inspired by memory!
xo,
Amy

Please share a comment below if you wish.

Sunday, April 22, 2018

Poem #22 - End with a Message


Welcome to my 2018 National Poetry Month Project! I love projects!
It is wonderful to find so many folks are joining in at blogs and elsewhere. 
All are welcome!

This year at The Poem Farm, I will be writing a new poem every day about the constellation Orion.  Every day I will highlight a new poetic technique, a technique used by poets and by writers of other genres as well. After all, the techniques of poets are the techniques of all writers. I will be using my Fall 2017 Heinemann book, POEMS ARE TEACHERS, to lead me as I write all April long.

My hope is that some readers might also choose to dive deeply into writing about 1 Subject 30 Ways, to stick with one subject for a few days or for a whole month, approaching it from a variety of perspectives, in a multitude of structures, and with many playful word explorations.

Here is a list of this month's poems so far:


And now...today's technique.

Message End Drafting
Photo by Amy LV



Students - Today I did something that I do not usually do - I began with the end in mind.  I suppose that I do this sometimes, but usually I allow a poem to lead me to its end.  I listen for where the poem wishes to go.  But because I shared yesterday that I would be ending with a message, I thought about what message I might offer related to Orion.

Orion makes me feel small.  The whole sky does.  And for this I am grateful.

Like many people, I can get caught up in my days, all in a fluster about things to do and things to worry about.  But the great expanse of sky and nature heals and teaches me.  Yes, I am small.  It will all be okay.

I wrote this poem to write toward that end.  I hoped to show the change in the speaker's feeling from beginning to end, and you can see how the motion in the middle lines moves the speaker both physically and emotionally.  Sometimes poems surprise you that way.

In my book POEMS ARE TEACHERS, I highlight finding ending with a message with a poem by Charles Waters. The title of his poem (page 208) is "Putting in the Work."  The two student poet mentors (page 211) are Bryce P. with "The Beach" and Dylan K. with "Try Harder."  Thank you to these poets, and thank you to the teachers of the student poets in this book!

Remember, you can connect with all kinds of poetry goodness happening throughout April 2018 at my introductory National Poetry Month post HERE.

In celebration of National Poetry Month, today, Sunday, April 22 at 11:59pm, I will draw a winning name of a commenter on Friday's Poetry Friday post. This person will win a copy of POEMS ARE TEACHERS, compliments of Heinemann.  I will announce the winner on Monday, April 23.  Please leave your contact information in your comment if you wish to win.

See you tomorrow...with striking words!
xo,
Amy

Please share a comment below if you wish.